The NASM-CPT Podcast With Rick Richey

Are you studying to become a personal trainer or just started your training career? NASM Master Instructor Rick Richey takes listeners on an informative and engaging journey to help establish a solid foundation in your fitness path.

Health & Fitness
Fitness
401
The Live Episode from Optima 2019
<p>Host Rick Richey takes the show on the road to answer listener questions live on tape from NASM Optima 2019.&nbsp;</p><p>Rick talks about:</p><ul> <li>Why the systematic approach NASM takes to learning is important</li> <li>The accreditation process</li> <li>How he got into presenting</li> <li>And much more</li></ul><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=podcast&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=OveractiveUnderactive2"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
15 min
402
Start Your First Personal Training Session with...
<p>The first session with a new client (or as a new trainer) can be daunting. How do you start the session? What do we talk about? Should I refer them to a physician based on certain&nbsp;answers? What assessments should I perform?</p><p>In this episode,&nbsp;Dr. Rick Richey&nbsp;takes us through his first session and what he talks about, why he talks about it and discusses how much time he spends engaging in discussion and assessment versus exercise in the first session. He also takes us through the Physical Activity Readiness-Questionnaire (PAR-Q) that NASM uses with clients prior to exercise.</p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
24 min
403
Overactive and Underactive Muscles Part 3: Arms...
<p>The finale in this series of short/tight/overactive muscles and lengthened overactive muscles based on the overhead squat assessment! Since the release of our first episode in this series, we have had excellent feedback, including several teachers suggesting it to their classes. This third of three will cover <strong>three</strong> frequent movement compensations in the overhead squat assessment:</p><ul> <li>Arms Fall Forward<br></li> <li>Scapular Elevation<br></li> <li>Forward Head<br></li></ul><p>Listen for a review of short muscles that lead to this compensation and lengthened muscles that allow the compensations to occur. These episodes are anatomy heavy and may help the listener better understand functional anatomy. Functional anatomy helps listeners better understand how muscles can contribute to movement compensation and dysfunction. It is excellent as a study guide, an explanation of what is going on, or just a refresher to those that already use the overhead squat assessment as a means of providing individualized programming.</p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=podcast&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=OveractiveUnderactive2"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
20 min
404
Overactive and Underactive Muscles Part 2: Exce...
<p>You asked for it – you got it! This is part two of three episodes where the topic of over- and underactive muscles will be discussed. This episode will cover two common movement compensations in the overhead squat assessment:</p><ul> <li>Excessive Forward Lean</li> <li>Low Back Arch (Anterior Pelvic Tilt)</li></ul><p>Listen for a review of short muscles that lead to this compensation and lengthened muscles that allow the compensations to occur. These episodes are anatomy heavy and may help the listener better understand functional anatomy. Functional anatomy helps listeners better understand how muscles can contribute to movement compensation and dysfunction. The outcomes may provide a better implementation of exercise preparation AND maybe, just maybe, help you if you're studying for an exam… ;-)&nbsp;</p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=podcast&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=OveractiveUnderactive2"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
22 min
405
Overactive and Underactive Muscles Part 1: Feet...
<p>According to listener feedback and requests, a discussion on over- and underactive muscles was the most popular request. This is part 1 of 3 episodes where this topic will be discussed. This episode will cover two common movement compensations in the overhead squat assessment:</p><p>- Feet Turn Out</p><p>- Knee Move-In</p><p>A review of short muscles that lead to this compensation and lengthened muscles that allow the compensations to occur. These episodes will be anatomy heavy and may help the listener better understand functional anatomy. Functional anatomy helps listeners better understand how muscles can contribute to movement compensation and dysfunction.</p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
23 min
406
The Importance of Being Certified
<p>As an independent gym owner, I get monthly inquiries from uncertified personal trainers that have been training for many … many… years that have decided not to renew their certification. Yet they still wish to train out of my facility. Below is a small list of responses I have gotten throughout the years when I ask why they are not certified:</p><p>“I could teach these courses.”</p><p>“I know more than most trainers anyway because I’ve been doing this for a long time.”</p><p>“It’s all a racket” … (to make you smarter… oh no!)</p><p>I, being relatively educated in the space of exercise and health science, still maintain multiple certifications. I actually want to increase my education as opposed to only continuing education because a CEU requirement. So, when those that are uncertified want to explain why they should train out of my facilities in NYC, I do not balk. It is unprofessional and there is a HUGE liability issue at stake as well. If you want to become a personal trainer – you MUST get certified. Preferably NASM…;-)</p><p>This episode of the NASM CPT Podcast will discuss, from my perspective, why trainers need to be certified. Tune in and provide your feedback and ideas for future topics to me on IG: @dr.rickrichey or email rick.richey@nasm.org</p><p><br></p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org?utm_source=podcast&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=ImportanceofBeingCertified"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
23 min
407
Abdominal Hollowing v Abdominal Bracing
<p><br></p><p>Abdominal hollowing (or the draw-in maneuver) and abdominal bracing are both incorporated by therapists, trainers, and other exercise specialists to benefit persons with lumbar instability (Vaičienė, Berškienė, Slapsinskaite, Mauricienė, &amp; Razon, 2018). There is a tendency for professionals to pick one of these interventions while downplaying the validity and value of the other. Integrated training is based on the implementing all evidence that works during the appropriate time with an understanding of how we can optimize outcomes for our clients. We will review the research surrounding abdominal hollowing and abdominal bracing to provide a better understanding of the evidence of their practical applications.</p><p>Evidence shows that deep abdominal muscles are more activated with abdominal hollowing and surface muscles more activated with abdominal bracing (Vaičienė, Berškienė, Slapsinskaite, Mauricienė, &amp; Razon, 2018). Hollowing has shown to increase local spinal stabilizers (Lee et al., 2013; Suehiro et al., 2014; Kim &amp; Oh, 2015; Lee et al., 2016) and LPHC stability while minimizing the facilitation of global muscle activity during exercise (Suehiro et al., 2014; Kahlaee, Ghamkhar, &amp; Arab, 2017). Abdominal hollowing was found superior to abdominal bracing for increasing LPHC stability and leg stiffness in hopping tasks (Dupeyron, Hertzog, Micallef, &amp; Perrey, 2013). Though it does seem that maintaining a neutral spine (Reeve &amp; Dilley, 2009) and costodiaphragmatic (chest / belly) breathing is important to the optimization of muscle activation while performing abdominal hollowing (Ha, Kwon, Kim, &amp; Choung, 2014).</p><p>Multiple data questions the efficacy of treating LBP solely using abdominal hollowing (Unsgaard-Tondel et al., 2012; Vasseljen et al., 2012; Wong et al., 2013). McGill, arguably one of this generation’s top researchers on exercise and the spine, is not a fan of abdominal hollowing, and argues that the transverse abdominus should activate when abdominal bracing is done appropriately without the need to draw-in the navel (2016). He provides evidence that core stiffness is of far more value when it comes to protecting the back (Lee &amp; McGill, 2015).</p><p>Evidence supporting both abdominal bracing and abdominal hollowing work to increase LPHC stabilization. We are not left with a debate on efficacy of these two techniques, but application. Which application should we employee and when?</p><p><br></p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=general&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=gasandsaid"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
22 min
408
Integrated Flexibility Continuum
<p>NASM provides an integrated model of flexibility that includes corrective, active, and functional flexibility categories. The specific techniques used within the Integrated Flexibility Continuum are as follows:</p><p><em><strong>Integrated Flexibility Continuum</strong></em></p><p>Corrective Flexibility – designed to increase joint ROM for shortened muscles. It is specifically for the areas of hypomobility.</p><ul> <li>SMR/SMT/Foam Rolling</li> <li>Static Stretching</li></ul><p>Active Flexibility</p><ul> <li>SMR/SMT/Foam Rolling</li> <li>Active Isolated Stretching</li></ul><p>Functional Flexibility</p><ul> <li>SMR/SMT/Foam Rolling</li> <li>Dynamic Flexibility</li></ul><p>This episode talks about just because muscles “feel” tight doesn’t mean that they are in fact tight. Assessments are to be done to identify shortened muscles verses lengthened muscles. In an integrated model the progression from on type of flexibility category to another should be aspired to. As initial limits in ROM begin to increase through corrective strategies, more active techniques can be applied to provide strength to the new found ROM. Just like in the OPT model, once strength gains are made, speed can be applied. In this case, functional flexibility can include dynamic flexibility techniques where momentum and speed are added to the stretch. This integrated flexibility continuum is a brilliant, yet simple model to follow to support our client’s flexibility needs.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Key Terms:&nbsp;</strong></p><p>Muscle Spindle = “Stretch-O-Meter”</p><p>Golgi Tendon Organ (GTO) – “Tension-O-Meter”&nbsp;</p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
20 min
409
Core Training Overview
<p>NASM CPT Podcast – Core Training Overview</p><p>Even the biggest bodybuilder with the best set of “Abs” may have a weak core as storied in this episode of the NASM CPT Podcast. Rick talks about the biggest person he’s ever met in real life and how his core stabilization system was … less than impressive. There’s also discussion about statistics, research, and the difference between the stabilization between each vertebrae and stabilization between the pelvis and ribcage.&nbsp;</p><p>Several muscles of the core stabilization system are discussed such as the transverse abdominus, diaphragm, multifidus, and more examining what they do and how they function to support the core.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Maxims to remember:&nbsp;</strong></p><p>- Stabilize the spine before moving it</p><p>- Core is the anchoring point of all functional movement</p><p>- “You can’t have distal mobility without proximal stability”</p><p>Listen to this episode of the NASM CPT podcast for insights about the core and what it’s for and why stabilization of the spine is important.</p><p><br></p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=general&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=core"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.&nbsp;</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
24 min
410
Bones!
<p>&nbsp;NASM CPT PODCAST – BONES!</p><p>This episode is a review of the skeletal systems. Anatomy only! No ROM or joint actions. Today Rick talks about the bones themselves, names, locations, and mnemonics to help remember and recall their names. This is a high-level overview, so we will just focus on the main bones in the appendicular and axial skeleton.&nbsp;</p><p>- Breakfast, lunch, and dinner helps with knowing the number of vertebrae in each section of the spine</p><p>- Small lies help with knowing which bone in the lower leg is which</p><p>- Some bone names will help with learning names of certain muscles</p><p>Tune in to this episode to help solidify an overview of the skeletal anatomy OR use it for ideas to help teach bony anatomy to your students or clients.</p><p><br></p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=general&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=bones"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.&nbsp;</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
19 min
411
How to Remember the Names of the Muscles
<p>&nbsp;NASM CPT Podcast – Anatomy NAMES</p><p>One of the most common questions I get after a workshop is “how do you remember the names of all those muscles?” So, today we discuss anatomical words for muscles and from where they are derived. It’s important to learn the language of your profession and it’s simpler than you think!</p><p>Muscles reviewed in this episode include:</p><ul> <li>Gastrocnemius</li> <li>Soleus</li> <li>Hamstrings</li> <li>Semimembranosus / Semitendionsus</li> <li>Biceps Femoris</li> <li>Quadriceps</li> <li>Rectus Abdominus</li> <li>Gluteus Maximus</li> <li>Iliopsoas</li> <li>Trapezius</li> <li>Rhomboids</li> <li>Sternocleidomastoid</li></ul><p>Check out the book “Carnal Knowledge” by Charles Hodgson and tune in to this episode of the NASM CPT podcast to learn roots for these anatomical body parts and how memorizing these them MAY not be as difficult as you once thought.</p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=general&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=musclenames"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.&nbsp;</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
27 min
412
General Adaptation Syndrome and SAID Principles
<p>Your body is apt at dealing with stress and will make adjustments as needed to cope. General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS) allows us to look at the introduction of stress to our system and a spectrum of our body’s ability to deal with it. The levels of the GAS principle are:</p><p><br></p><p>The Alarm Reaction stage</p><ul> <li>What the …!!!</li> <li>Increased soreness</li> <li>Questioning choice of exercises and sometimes exercising in general</li> <li>Decreased performance</li></ul><p>The Resistance stage</p><ul> <li>“Good stress” aka eustress</li> <li>Getting used to the stress</li> <li>Minimized soreness&nbsp;</li> <li>Physiologically fine with practiced exercises</li> <li>Increased performance</li></ul><p>The Exhaustion / Overtraining stage</p><ul> <li>“Over stressed” aka distressed&nbsp;</li> <li>Not enough recovery</li> <li>Irritable&nbsp;</li> <li>Exhausted&nbsp;</li> <li>Decreased performance</li></ul><p>The SAID principle stands for Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands, which means your body (and mind) will adapt to the specific exercises, stresses, and other demands you impose. As long as you don’t go into the exhaustion phase of the GAS you will continue to build resistance to these stresses and adapt. Work from a place of moderate stress where you can find success and build from there! Learn more by listening to this episode of the NASM CPT podcast.</p><p><br></p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=general&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=gasandsaid"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.&nbsp;</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
23 min
413
Introducing the OPT Model
<p>The <strong>OPT Model</strong>, or <strong>Optimum Performance Training Model</strong>, is a fitness training system developed by NASM. The OPT Model is based on scientific evidence and principles that progresses an individual through five training phases: stabilization endurance, strength endurance, hypertrophy, maximal strength and power.</p><p><br></p><p>In the inaugural episode of the NASM CPT Podcast, host Rick Richey walks through exactly what the OPT model is, how it's used and why it's beneficial for trainers of all levels who want to help their clients.&nbsp;</p><p><br></p><p>With this easy-to-use model, you'll be able to help clients achieve their fitness goals, no matter their age or athletic ability - from beginners, to pros.</p><p>The OPT™ model - and NASM as a whole - is simply powerful.</p><p><em><strong>Get 20% off your order now by calling 800-460-6276 or visiting </strong></em><a href="https://www.nasm.org/?utm_source=general&amp;utm_medium=podcast&amp;utm_campaign=organic&amp;utm_content=gasandsaid"><em><strong>NASM.org</strong></em></a><em><strong>, and using the code Podcast 20.&nbsp;</strong></em></p>--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasm-cpt/message
22 min