New Books in Education

Interviews with Scholars of Education about their New Books

Science
Social Sciences
201
Zachary Lockman, “Field Notes: The Making of Mi...
The dominant narrative in the history of the study of the Middle East has claimed that the Cold War was what pushed Middle East studies to develop, as part of a greater trend in area studies. Drawing on his previous work in 2004’s Contending Visions of...
31 min
202
Erica Rosenfeld Halverson, et. al, “Makeology: ...
Erica Halverson, professor of education at the University of Wisconsin Madison, joins us in this episode to discuss the recently published co-edited volume entitled, Makeology: Makers as Learners (Routledge, 2016).
52 min
203
Daniel P. Keating, “Born Anxious: The Lifelong ...
Anxiety has become a social epidemic. People feel anxious all the time about nearly everything: their work, families, and even survival. However, research shows that some of us are more prone to chronic anxiety than others,
56 min
204
Jim Rickabaugh, “Tapping the Power of Personali...
Jim Rickabaugh, Senior Advisor to the Institute for Personalized Learning, joins us in this episode to discuss his recently published book, entitled Tapping the Power of Personalized Learning: A Roadmap for School Leaders (ASCD, 2016).
41 min
205
Theodore Burnes and Jeanne Stanley, “Teaching L...
Despite the prominence of LGBTQ issues in our current social consciousness, many people still know little about the LGBTQ community, which means that teaching about this community and its issues is an important job.
50 min
206
Lee Trepanier, ed. “Why the Humanities Matter T...
Lee Trepanier, Professor of Political Science at Saginaw Valley State University in Michigan, edited this important analysis of why the humanities matter, especially within higher education. Trepanier’s collection,
29 min
207
Linda Ragsdale on “Alphabetter” (Flowerpot Pres...
Author, illustrator and international speaker/teacher, Linda Ragsdale talks about her Peace Dragon Tale series of books for children and shares how the powerful skills of View, Voice and Choice can lead children and adults through challenging parts of ...
31 min
208
Edward Vickers, “Education and Society in Post-...
Dr. Edward Vickers, Professor of Comparative Education at Kyushu University, joins New Books Network to discuss his recently published book, entitled Education and Society in Post-Mao China (Routledge Studies in Education and Society in Asia, 2017).
30 min
209
Timothy D. Walker, “Teach Like Finland: 33 Simp...
In this episode, I speak with Tim Walker, the author of Teach Like Finland: 33 Simple Strategies for Joyful Classrooms (W. W. Norton & Company, 2017). This book stems from recent interest in Finland’s educational system resulting from its success on in...
31 min
210
Lisa Wade, “American Hookup: The New Culture of...
“Hookup” has become a buzzword, a misleading concept for students, parents and educators alike–one that confuses more than explains the nuances of this complex and pervasive trend. In American Hookup: The New Culture of Sex on Campus (W. W. Norton,
44 min
211
Mark Bray, ed. “Researching Private Supplementa...
Mark Bray, Chair Professor in the Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong, joins the New Books Network to discuss his recently coedited book volume, entitled Researching Private Supplementary Tutoring: Methodological Lessons from Diverse Cultures...
24 min
212
Carrie J. Preston, “Learning to Kneel: Noh, Mod...
Carrie J. Preston‘s new book tells the story of the global circulation of noh-inspired performances, paying careful attention to the ways these performances inspired twentieth-century drama, poetry, modern dance, film, and popular entertainment.
69 min
213
Andrew Causey, “Drawn to See: Drawing as Ethnog...
In his new book Drawn to See: Drawing as an Ethnographic Method (University of Toronto Press, 2016) Andrew Causey argues that social science practitioners can cultivate new ways of experiencing the world through drawing.
54 min
214
Pat Farenga on John Holt’s “Freedom and Beyond”...
In this episode, I speak with Pat Farenga about the new edition of John Holt’s Freedom and Beyond (HoltGWS LLC, 2017). This book offers a broad critique of traditional schooling and its capacity for solving social problems.
43 min
215
Kelly Belanger, “Invisible Seasons: Title IX an...
As I write this, the women’s basketball team for the University of Connecticut is in the midst of a 107 game winning streak. It’s quite reasonable to assert that Geno Auriemma will end his career as the most successful coach in basketball history.
76 min
216
Randy Stoecker, “Liberating Service Learning an...
It’s common for colleges in the U.S. to have service learning programs of one kind or another. These are sometimes criticized as being liberal or even radical endeavors — especially if “social justice” language is employed. But what if these are,
37 min
217
Tressie McMillan Cottom, “Lower Ed: The Troubli...
How might we account for the rapid rise of for-profit educational institutions over the past few decades, who are the students who attend them, how can we evaluate what those schools do and why, and are there actually lessons that traditional higher ed...
51 min
218
Amy Brown, “A Good Investment? Philanthropy and...
There has been much talk in the news recently about funding for public education, the emergence of charter schools, and the potential of school vouchers. How much does competition for financing in urban public schools depend on marketing and perpetuati...
62 min
219
Daniel Magaziner, “The Art of Life in South Afr...
Daniel Magaziner’s latest book, The Art of Life in South Africa (Ohio University Press, 2016, and UKZN Press, 2017), is a welcome addition to the intellectual history of South Africa. Rich in color images and documentary history,
54 min
220
Mical Raz, “What’s Wrong with the Poor: Psychia...
In What’s Wrong with the Poor: Psychiatry, Race, and the War on Poverty (University of North Carolina Press, 2016), Mical Raz offers a deep dive into the theoretical roots of the Head Start program, and offers a fascinating story of unexpected policy o...
36 min
221
Ellen Hazelkorn, “The Civic University: The Pol...
Ellen Hazelkorn, Policy Advisor to the Higher Education Authority (HEA), and Director, Higher Education Policy Research Unit (HEPRU), Dublin Institute of Technology, joins the New Books Network to discuss her recently published book,
22 min
222
Deborah Hopkinson “Steamboat School” (Jump At t...
In Steamboat School (Jump at the Sun, 2016), an historical picture book based on true events, author Deborah Hopkinson recounts the story of Reverend John Berry Meachum’s brave act to defy an 1847 Missouri law designed to prohibit African American chil...
25 min
223
Nancy Weiss Malkiel, ‘Keep the Damned Women Out...
Within the context of the social upheaval of the 1960s and 1970s, elite institutions of higher education began to feel pressure to open their doors to women. In ‘Keep the Damned Women Out’: The Struggle for Coeducation (Princeton University Press,
42 min
224
Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, “Growing Each Other Up...
With Growing Each Other Up: When Our Children Become Our Teachers (University of Chicago Press, 2016), Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot offers an intimately detailed, emotionally powerful and different perspective of the parenting experience than we are used to...
2 min
225
Alan J. Levinovitz, “The Limits of Religious To...
The Pope said that Donald Trump wasn’t much of a Christian if all he can think about is building walls. Trump replied that it was “disgraceful” for a any leader, even the Pope, “to question another man’s religion or faith.
55 min
226
Ondine Gross, “Restore the Respect: How to Medi...
In this episode, I speak with Ondine Gross, the author of Restore the Respect: How to Mediate School Conflicts and Keep Students Learning (Brookes, 2016). Her book outlines how teachers and administrators can implement mediation protocols in their scho...
42 min
227
Lee Gutkind, ed., “What I Didn’t Know: True Sto...
In this episode, I speak with Lee Gutkind, the editor of What I Didn’t Know: True Stories of Becoming a Teacher (In Fact Books, 2016). His book shares more than twenty firsthand accounts of teachers working in different contexts.
25 min
228
Steven Levy, “Starting from Scratch: One Classr...
In this episode, I speak with Steven Levy, the author of Starting from Scratch: One Classroom Builds Its Own Curriculum (Heinemann, 1996). His book shares his reflections on the complexities of teaching by drawing upon his years spent implementing proj...
58 min
229
Heather Shumaker, “It’s OK to Go Up the Slide: ...
In this episode, I speak with Heather Shumaker, the author of It’s OK to Go Up the Slide: Renegade Rules for Raising Confident and Creative Kids (TarcherPerigee, 2016). Her book offers advice to parents looking for new approaches to common problems fac...
34 min
230
Heather Dowd, “Classroom Management in the Digi...
In this episode, I speak with Heather Dowd, the author of Classroom Management in the Digital Age: Effective Practices for Technology-Rich Learning Spaces (EdTechTeam, 2016). Her book offers a series of structures for teachers beginning to use technolo...
31 min
231
Rebecca S. Natow, “Higher Education Rulemaking:...
Rebecca S. Natow, Senior Research Associate with the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, joins New Books Network to discuss her recently published book, entitled Higher Education Rulemaking: The Politics of Creat...
34 min
232
Paul Benneworth et al., “The Impact and Future ...
What is the future for Arts and Humanities in Europe? The podcast discusses these questions with Paul Benneworth, one of the authors, along with Magnus Gulbrandsen and Ellen Hazelkorn, of The Impact and Future of Arts and Humanities Research (Palgrave,...
42 min
233
Matthew Pauly, “Breaking the Tongue: Language, ...
Matthew Pauly’s Breaking the Tongue: Language, Education, and Power in Soviet Ukraine, 1923-1934 (University of Toronto Press, 2014) offers a detailed investigation of the language policy–officially termed Ukrainization–that was introduced in Ukraine d...
69 min
234
Kate Merkel-Hess, “The Rural Modern: Reconstruc...
Kate Merkel-Hess‘s new book looks closely at a loose group of rural reformers in 1920s and 1930s China who were trying to create a rural alternative to urban modernity. Focusing on the Rural Reconstruction Movement of roughly 1933-1937,
67 min
235
Michael Copperman, “Teacher: Two Years in the M...
Anyone who has spent time in a school as an adult probably knows how hard it is for teachers to leave their work when they come home every night. There always seems to be more work for them to do, along with inordinate responsibility and a sense that e...
41 min
236
Damien M. Sojoyner, “First Strike: Educational ...
Dr. Damien M. Sojoyner, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, joins the New Books Network to discuss his recently published book, entitled First Strike: Educational Enclosures in Black Los Angeles (University of M...
28 min
237
Jonathan Todres and Sarah Higinbotham, “Human R...
How can children grow to realize their inherent rights and respect the rights of others? In Human Rights in Children’s Literature: Imagination and the Narrative of Law (Oxford University Press, 2016), authors Jonathan Todres and Sarah Higinbotham explo...
42 min
238
Nicholson Baker, “Substitute: Going to School w...
Parents often wonder what their children do at school all day. How different is it from what they remember years ago? Teachers often hear similar questions from their friends. Is it like what they imagine? If these adults could really understand,
24 min
239
John Owens, “Confessions of a Bad Teacher: The ...
As you spend more time working in one role, organization, or field, it can become easy to lose perspective on how your work is similar or different from that being done by people in other positions, places, and industries.
36 min
240
Daniel Rechtschaffen, “The Way of Mindful Educa...
Time and resources are scarce for many teachers. Often times, these same teachers are under immense pressure to produce higher test scores and severely constrained with the actions they can take in their own classrooms.
45 min
241
Alfred Posamentier and Stephen Krulik, “Effecti...
From the title, you might guess that Alfred Posamentier and Stephen Krulik’s Effective Techniques to Motivate Mathematics Instruction (Routledge, 2016) is aimed at mathematics teachers which it is. However,
53 min
242
Milton Chen, “Education Nation: Six Leading Edg...
It feels like schools are in the midst of unprecedented change — sometimes more in different places and sometimes more in different ways. Many people are thinking about education differently than they did a few years ago.
48 min
243
Megan Tompkins Stange, “Policy Patrons: Philant...
Megan Tompkins-Stange is the author of Policy Patrons: Philanthropy, Education Reform, and the Politics of Influence (Harvard Education Press, 2016). She is assistant professor at the Gerald Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan.
18 min
244
George Couros, “The Innovator’s Mindset: Empowe...
One of the most commonly used words right now in education is “innovation.” It seems to be part of any response to our collective anxiety over the fact that the way we educate children does not seem to have changed as quickly as the ways we access info...
53 min
245
Ellen Mayock, “Gender Shrapnel in the Academic ...
Recent controversies surrounding sexual harassment and assault on college campuses have sparked heated discussions surrounding the everyday experiences of women on college campuses. Female students and faculty members have often felt at odds with their...
61 min
246
Darian M. Parker, “Sartre and New Child Left Be...
Darian M. Parker joins the New Books Network to discuss his recently published book, Sartre and No Child Left Behind: An Existential Psychoanalytic Anthropology of Urban Schooling (Lexington Books, 2015). Through an ethnographic lens,
34 min
247
Diane Ehrensaft, “The Gender Creative Child: Pa...
The gender binary is recently giving way to gender infinity, and our youngest members of society are both driving and benefiting from this evolution. They’re finding novel ways of expressing their true gender identities,
75 min
248
Nicole Nguyen, “A Curriculum of Fear: Homeland ...
It can be tempting to generalize certain attributes of schools as either being good or bad. Magnet and charter schools are often characterized as being inherently good. They usually offer special programs that ground all of their instruction.
40 min
249
Grant Lichtman, “#EdJourney: A Roadmap to the F...
Whatever your role — teacher, principal, or superintendent — when you work in a school system, you experience tensions between your reasons for going into education and how you actually spend your time in schools.
41 min
250
Matt Renwick, “Digital Student Portfolios: A Wh...
Most of the time, school performance is not like performance in other arenas. In music, we want people to play something for us. In sports, we want people to show us our skills. Performance in school is filtered through test scores and letter grades.
37 min
251
Campbell F. Scribner, “The Fight for Local Cont...
Battles over school politics from curriculum to funding to voucher systems are key and contentious features of the political landscape today. Many of these familiar fights started in the 1970s. However, these battles have roots even earlier in mid-twen...
58 min
252
Ron Berger, et. al. “Learning that Lasts: Chall...
The school structures we present to teachers can sometimes resemble two extremes. In the first set of circumstances, teachers have enormous autonomy over what they teach, when they teach it, and how they teach it. In the second,
58 min
253
Paula S. Fass, “The End of American Childhood: ...
Paula S. Fass is a professor of history emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. Her book The End of American Childhood: A History of Parenting from Life on the Frontier to the Managed Child (Princeton University Press,
58 min
254
Russell Rickford, “We Are an African People: In...
Russell Rickford is an assistant professor of history at Cornell University. We Are an African People: Independent Education, Black Power and the Radical Imagination (Oxford University Press, 2016) offers an intellectual history of the Pan African nati...
54 min
255
Jon Hale, “The Freedom Schools: Student Activis...
Dr. Jon Hale, Assistant Professor of Educational History, Department of Teacher Education, College of Charleston, joins the New Books Network to discuss his new book, entitled The Freedom Schools: Student Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movem...
24 min
256
Les Back, “Academic Diary: Or Why Higher Educat...
Why does higher education still matter? In Academic Diary: Or Why Higher Education Still Matters, Les Back, a professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths’ College, University of London, offers a series of reflections framed by the time of the academic year.
39 min
257
Chuing Prudence Chou and Jonathan Spangler, eds...
Dr. Chuing Prudence Chou, Professor, Department of Education, National Chengchi University, rejoins the New Books Network to discuss her newly edited volume, Chinese Education Models in a Global Age (Springer, 2016), co-edited with Jonathan Spangler,
30 min
258
Andrew Woolford, “This Benevolent Experiment” (...
I grew up in Michigan, in the United States, where I was surrounded by places named with Native American names. I drove to Saginaw to play in basketball tournaments and to Pontiac to watch an NBA team play. Now in Kansas,
51 min
259
Rajika Bhandari and Mirka Martel, “Social Justi...
Rajika Bhandari, Deputy Vice President, Research and Evaluation Institute of International Education (IIE), and Mirka Martel, Assistant Director of Research and Evaluation at IIE, join New Books in Education to discuss a new report from the organizatio...
26 min
260
Ira Lit, “The Bus Kids: Children’s Experiences ...
Many of us are familiar with the court-mandated bussing programs created in an effort to achieve school desegregation in the 1960s and 1970s. Far fewer of us realize there were also voluntary transfer programs that were crafted in out-of-court settleme...
64 min
261
Roy Fox, “Facing the Sky: Composing Through Tra...
All of us experience trauma at various points throughout our lives. On one end of the spectrum, we have negative experiences from which we tend to think we can recover quickly. This might include a fight with a friend or an hurtful comment made in pass...
46 min
262
Pedro Garcia de Leon, “Data Source: Education GPS”
Pedro Garcia de Leon, Policy Analyst for Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), joins New Books in Education to discuss the organizations new data website, gpseducation.oecd.org. The new site streamlines all of OECDs educational...
19 min
263
Kathleen Holscher, “Religious Lessons: Catholic...
In New Mexico, before World War Two, Catholic sisters in full habits routinely taught in public schools. In her fascinating new book, Religious Lessons: Catholic Sisters and the Captured Schools Crisis in New Mexico (Oxford University Press, 2012),
63 min
264
Mark Carrigan, “Social Media for Academics” (Sa...
How can academics respond to the rise of social media? Or should they respond at all? In Social Media for Academics (Sage, 2016), Mark Carrigan, from the Centre for Social Ontology, offers an informed and reflective take on social media,
40 min
265
Lenz, Wells and Kingston, “Transforming Schools...
All of us are familiar with multiple-choice tests. They may be the one thing that you can find in kindergarten classrooms, college courses, and workplace training programs. But why are they so common? Multiple-choice tests may be the simplest and easie...
65 min
266
Howard P. Chudacoff, “Changing the Playbook: Ho...
March Madness is big business. Each year the NCAA collects $700 million for television rights to the men’s college basketball tournament, under the terms of a 14-year, $10.8 billion contract with CBS and Turner Broadcasting. The two networks, in turn,
52 min
267
Katerina Bodovski, “Across Three Continents: Re...
Dr. Katerina Bodovski, Associate Professor of Education, Department of Education Policy Studies, College of Education, Penn State University, joins New Books in Education to discuss her new and very personal book,
33 min
268
Benjamin Castleman, “The 160-Character Solution...
Teenagers live in their phones. As an educator you can try to pull them away or meet them where they are. The 160-Character Solution: How Text Messaging and Other Behavioral Strategies Can Improve Education (Johns Hopkins University Press,
56 min
269
Erika Christakis, “The Importance of Being Litt...
Everyone hates being underestimated. We want to feel included without others showing us condescension. At the same time, no one wants to be overestimated. We want to feel challenged without others overwhelming us.
63 min
270
Mike Lanza, “Playborhood: Turn Your Neighborhoo...
When adults today look back on their time as children, many of their memories may come from moments when they were engaged in free play with kids in their neighborhood — exploring creeks, riding bikes, and playing pick-up sports. Moments like these,
46 min
271
Nadim Bakhshov, “Against Capitalist Education: ...
Nadim Bakhshov joins the New Books in Network to discuss his book Against Capitalist Education: What is Education for? (Zero Books, 2015). The book posits new alternatives to educational thought and philosophy through an innovated, yet classic,
29 min
272
Geoffrey Baker, “El Sistema: Orchestrating Vene...
El Sistema, the massive Venezuelan youth orchestra program, has been hailed in some quarters as the next big idea in music education (if not as the savior of classical music itself). Any who have found the press coverage of El Sistema suspiciously rosy...
60 min
273
Nicola Rollock et al. “The Colour of Class: The...
The experience of the African American middle class has been an important area of research in the USA. However, the British experience has, by comparison, not been subject to the same amount of attention, particularly with regard to the middle class ex...
51 min
274
Nikhil Goyal, “Schools on Trial: How Freedom an...
There is no shortage of talk about our public schools being broken. Some critics say we need to embrace a reform agenda that includes more standardized testing and a longer school day for students and performance pay and an end to tenure for teachers.
51 min
275
Jana Mohr Lone, “The Philosophical Child” (Rowm...
From time to time, we all ponder life’s most difficult questions. “Is there a god?” “How can I live a good life?” “What happens when you die?” When we share our worries or wonderings with friends and family,
41 min
276
Deborah Carlisle Solomon, “Baby Knows Best: Rai...
Our lives are so busy nowadays that we are almost always multitasking to the extent that those around us let us get away with it. We rarely take the time to be fully present for others and allow our observations to inform how we treat them.
50 min
277
Miao Li, “Citizenship Education and Migrant You...
Dr. Miao Li, assistant professor, Department of Sociology and School of Philosophy and Social Development at Shandong University, joins New Books in Education to discuss Citizenship Education and Migrant Youth in China: Pathways to the Urban Underclass...
30 min
278
Lisong Liu, “Chinese Student Migration and Sele...
Lisong Liu‘s thoughtful new book is an important and insightful read for any of us who are currently engaged in conversations about supporting the increasing numbers of international students in the North American academy.
68 min
279
William C. Smith, ed., “The Global Testing Cult...
William C. Smith (ed.), senior associate with RESULTS Educational Fund, joins New Books in Education to discuss The Global Testing Culture: Shaping Education Policy, Perceptions, and Practice (Symposium Books, 2016).
24 min
280
Carlos Fraenkel, “Teaching Plato in Palestine: ...
We tend to think of Philosophy as a professional academic subject that is taught in college classes, with its own rather specialized problems, vocabularies, and methods. But we also know that the discipline has its roots in the Socratic activity of try...
65 min
281
Kelly M. Duke Bryant, “Education as Politics: C...
Education as Politics: Colonial Schooling and Political Debate in Senegal, 1850s-1914 (University of Wisconsin Press, 2015) questions and complicates the two dominant narratives of African colonial education,
64 min
282
Garret Keizer, “Getting Schooled: The Reeducati...
Whatever its current prestige in our society, teaching is undoubtedly complex work. Like physicians and therapists, teachers work with people, rather than things. They try to help their students to improve over time, and while they have influence,
64 min
283
Tom Sperlinger, “Romeo and Juliet in Palestine:...
Tom Sperlinger, Reader in English Literature and Community Engagement at the University of Bristol, joins New Books in Education to discuss Romeo and Juliet in Palestine: Teaching Under Occupation (Zero Books, 2015).
26 min
284
Edmund Hamann, et al., “Revisiting Education in...
Dr. Edmund Hamann, Dr. Stanton Wortham, Dr. Enrique G. Murillo (Eds.) have provided a fascinating and expansive volume on Latino education in the US that features an array of scholars from around the world,
32 min
285
John Holt, “Escape from Childhood: The Needs an...
We treat children differently than we treat adults. For example, if we would like children to do something, we use directives with them, rather than asking them. When we do ask them to do something, we expect them to do it,
47 min
286
Dana Suskind, “Thirty Million Words: Building a...
We may disagree about whether phonics or whole language is the better approach to reading instruction or whether bilingual education or English immersion is the better way to support English language learners. Whatever our opinions are,
34 min
287
Ron Berger, “Leaders of Their Own Learning: Tra...
Many of us went through school not fully knowing what we were supposed to be learning or how our teachers were measuring our progress. These priorities and processes were largely hidden to us as students because they were assumed to be irrelevant or un...
52 min
288
Leonard Cassuto, “The Graduate School Mess: Wha...
The discontented graduate student is something of a cultural fixture in the U.S. Indeed theirs is a sorry lot. They work very hard, earn very little, and have very poor prospects. Nearly all of them want to become professors, but most of them won’t.
45 min
289
Eric Nadelstern, “Ten Lessons from New York Cit...
With 40 years of public school experience, from teacher to high-ranking official of one of the largest school systems in the US, Eric Nadelstern has a deep perspective and nuanced understanding of the current educational landscape.
32 min
290
Alec Patton, “Work That Matters: The Teacher’s ...
Every year, thousands of teachers visit San Diego to understand project-based learning and find inspiration in the work done by students at High Tech High. Their multimedia presentations have been installed in public art galleries,
50 min
291
Ellen Hazelkorn, “Rankings and the Reshaping of...
Ellen Hazelkorn, Policy Advisor to the Higher Education Authority (Ireland) and Director of the Higher Education Policy Research Unit (HEPRU), Dublin Institute of Technology, provides an in-depth analysis of higher educational rankings and what they me...
29 min
292
William Elliott III and Melinda Lewis, “Real Co...
Dr. William Elliott III, associate professor in the School of Social Welfare at the University of Kansas, and Melinda Lewis, associate professor of practice in the School of Social Welfare at the University of Kansas,
30 min
293
Ebrahim Moosa, “What is a Madrasa?” (U of North...
Recent years have witnessed a spate of journalistic and popular writings on the looming threat to civilization that lurks in traditional Islamic seminaries or madrasas that litter the physical and intellectual landscape of the Muslim world.
58 min
294
Madeline Y. Hsu, “The Good Immigrants: How the ...
With high educational and professional attainment, Asian Americans are often portrayed as the “Model Minority” in popular media. This portrayal, though, is widely panned by academics and activists who claim that it lacks nuance. Madeline Y. Hsu,
41 min
295
Ruth Hayhoe, “China Through the Lens of Compara...
Dr. Ruth Hayhoe, professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, has dedicated her academic career to the study of Chinese education. Now, after several decades of becoming one of the most recognizable names in...
33 min
296
Nick Sousanis, “Unflattening” (Harvard UP, 2015)
Nick Sousanis‘s new book is a must-read for anyone interested in thinking or teaching about the relationships between text, image, visuality, and knowledge. Unflattening (Harvard University Press, 2015) uses the medium of comics to explore “flatness of...
65 min
297
Chuing Prudence Chou, “The SSCI Syndrome in Hig...
Universities across the world have become more attuned to a global competition in higher education. International rankings and world class status are now critical focuses for these institutions. Academics have also gotten swept into this perceived comp...
38 min
298
Tom McLeish, “Faith and Wisdom in Science” (Oxf...
Much of the public debate about the relationship between science and theology has been antagonistic or adversarial. Proponents on both sides argue that their respective claims are contradictory–that the claims of science trump and even discredit the cl...
49 min
299
Rajika Bhandari and Alessia Lefebure, “Asia: Th...
The development of higher education in Asia has been as dramatic as the region’s rapid economic rise. The landscape of this diverse and ever-changing sector is thoroughly explored in Asia: The Next Higher Education Superpower?
41 min
300
Kevin Dougherty and Rebecca Natow, “The Politic...
Funding for higher education in the U.S. is an increasingly divisive issue. Some states have turned to policies that tie institutional performance to funding appropriations so to have great accountability on public expenditure.
45 min